DeKalb Kite Festival

Published: Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2012 12:47 p.m. CDT
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(Doug Oleson - doleson@shawmedia.com)
Joslene Juarez, 2, and Aiden Cerda, 3, of DeKalb show off the kites they bought at the Kite Festival. Neither child had flown a kite before.
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(Doug Oleson - doleson@shawmedia.com)
Three white cats flown by Dale and Pam Bowden of Wisconsin.
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(Doug Oleson - doleson@shawmedia.com)
Two enormous octopi sailed over the festival.
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(Doug Oleson - doleson@shawmedia.com)
A colorful tire kite spun in the breeze.
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(Doug Oleson - doleson@shawmedia.com)
David Boon of DeKalb has been flying kites since his was 14 but this was only his second trip to the kite festival.

DeKALB – Linda Larkey of the Kansas City Kite Club came all the way from Kansas to attend the seventh  annual DeKalb Kite Fest last Sunday.

“DeKalb has quite a reputation for kites,” she said.

Set up not far from her, Dale and Pam Bowden of Wisconsin said they fly kites all over the Midwest whenever they can get off work. The three huge white cat kites they flew in the baby blue sky above Northern Illinois University’s North 40 mingled with flying cows, a butterfly, a dragon, a pair of octopi and even a tire decorated with colorful balloons.

Much closer to home was David Boon of DeKalb, who flew a pair of Griffins, something he’s been doing for about 14 years.

“It’s more fun to fly a big kite when it’s windy out,” he said.

According to co-director Debbie Armstrong of the DeKalb Area Convention and Visitors Bureau, the festival was open to anyone who wanted to fly a kite, whether it was homemade or cost thousands of dollars. Fliers who didn’t already have one could purchase one from Chicago Kite Shop, one of a number of vendors set up on the south side of the field. Among the activities were kite making for kids, a candy drop, a wind sail that looked like a giant bug, a multiple flag display you could run through and a kite dancing to music.

“It’s a fun family event,” Ann Zavell of the Chicago Kite Shop said, adding that one of the purposes of the event is to get young people interested.

William Moore, 2, of Sycamore, was kiting with his father, Eric.

“We just thought this would be something he would enjoy,” Eric said.

That was also true of Joslene Juarez, 2, and Aiden Cerda, 3, of DeKalb, who both got their very first kites.

There were so many kites to look at, Aubrey Taylor, 2, had to take a minute before deciding which one she liked the best.

“The blue one,” she said.

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